Why SSL Certificate Is So Important for website

Why SSL Certificate Is So Important for website

What is SSL?

SSL stands for Secure Sockets Layer, an encryption technology that was originally created by Netscape in the 1990s. SSL creates an encrypted connection between your web server and your visitors’ web browser allowing for private information to be transmitted without the problems of eavesdropping, data tampering, and message forgery.

To enable SSL on a website, you will need to get an SSL Certificate that identifies you and install it on your web server. When a web browser is using an SSL certificate it usually displays a padlock icon but it may also display a green address bar. Once you have installed an SSL Certificate, you can access a site securely by changing the URL from http:// to https://. If SSL is properly deployed, the information transmitted between the web browser and the web server (whether it is contact or credit card information), is encrypted and only seen by the organization that owns the website.

Millions of online businesses use SSL certificates to secure their websites and allow their customers to place trust in them. In order to use the SSL protocol, a web server requires the use of an SSL certificate.

Types of SSL Certificates.

Discover of Solutions offers the following types of certificates:

Comodo SSL and Positive SSL provide security for one Domain Name and is best suited for small websites and blogs. Positive SSL Wildcard provides security for the primary Domain Name as well as its sub-domains, and is best suited for large e-commerce websites. Your certificate comes with a Comodo Secure Seal that serves as a constant reminder to customers that your site is protected

Why do I need SSL?

SSL helps prevent attackers or intrusive companies such as ISPs from tampering with the data sent between your websites and your users’ browsers. It is critical for protecting sensitive information such as a credit card numbers but it also protects your site from malware and prevents others from injecting advertisements into your resources.

SSL is the backbone of our secure Internet and it protects your sensitive information as it travels across the world’s computer networks. SSL is essential for protecting your website, even if it doesn’t handle sensitive information like credit cards. It provides privacy, critical security and data integrity for both your websites and your users’ personal information.

Why is it beneficial to have a dedicated IP address?

When it comes to hosting a website on a shared server, there is always quite a common controversial issue: Is it necessary to have a dedicated IP address for your website and why, if you just can use a shared one? Using a dedicated IP address provides certain crucial advantages, but let’s start with the definition first.

What is a Dedicated IP Address?

IP stands for Internet Protocol and is defined as a unique address assigned to each computer that is connected to a certain network. Internet Protocol address plays the role of a unique identifier that is used to provide the valid location of a machine or a website in a given network.

How to activate SSL or a Dedicated IP Address

What is browser compatibility?

The certificate that you purchase to secure your web site must be digitally signed by another certificate that is already in the trusted store of your user’s web browser. By doing this, the web browser will automatically trust your certificate because it is issued by someone that it already trusts. If it isn’t signed by a trusted root certificate, or if links in the certificate chain are missing, then the web browser will give a warning message that the web site may not be trusted.

So browser compatibility means that the certificate you buy is signed by a root certificate that is already trusted by most web browsers that your customers may be using. Unless otherwise noted, the certificates from all major certificate providers listed on SSL Shopper are compatible with 99% of all browsers.

How many domain names can I secure?

Most SSL server certificates will only secure a single domain name or sub-domain. For example, a certificate could secure www.yourdomain.com or mail.yourdomain.com but not both. The certificate will still work on a different domain name but the web browser will give an error anytime it sees that the address in the address bar doesn’t match the domain name (called a common name) in the certificate.



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